Artlands Summer Series

The Artlands Summer Series brings Artlands 2021 conference sessions that were not part of September’s livestream into the light.

Tune in to hear from a dazzling array of Tasmanian artists and arts workers whose fresh perspectives, powerful collaborations and keen sense of place provide a collective voice of hope.

Tin Camp

Founded by Yuwaalaraay/Yorta Yorta man Warren Mason, Tin Camp Studios is a culturally safe, First Nation led space that offers a model for best practice, community-generated artistic programs and cultural exchange. This session sees Warren talk about the origins of the Tin Camp project – a healing, music and storytelling space.


The Motherload

In this session Julie Waddington shares the discoveries, problems and successes she has had in the making of 'The Motherload', a creative documentary performance work developed over several years in collaboration with mothers across Tasmania, and a work that encapsulates the madnesses and the joys of motherhood.

'The Motherload' premiered at Junction Festival in September 2021.


Makers' Program: A Case Study for Creative Economies in Regional Tasmania

The University of Tasmania’s Makers’ Program was designed to support a broad range of cross-disciplinary Tasmanian artisans to develop their practice and derive an income from their creativity, while providing visitors with engaging cultural tourism experiences and learning encounters. In this session Joanne Gair talks about the success of the program, the inevitable impacts of the pandemic, and the new future that is poised to emerge


Design Eye Creative: 'paper on skin'

Lyndal Thorne tells the story of 'paper on skin’, a biennial wearable paper art event held in Burnie, Tasmania, where this local arts events is strongly linked to the industrial history of this former paper mill town.


Regional festivals as a device for cultural, social and economic change

Emma Porteus (Situate Art in Festivals) and Travis Tiddy (The Unconformity) lead a broad group conversation that examines the creative practice of regional festivals and their place in the national arts landscape. In this time of change, they ask, what does the future hold for our regional festivals?


A career in collaboration: Wendy Morrow

This session offers a space in which to pause and consider a repository of collective thinking and exchanges, by and with regional and remote artists in Australia. It provides a snapshot of Wendy Morrow’s processes, her experiences of significant works, and how collaborations have influenced the development of both her individual and collective arts practice.


Project O: an asset- and place-based approach to developing gender equity in regional communities

Project O is an arts-based family violence prevention program piloted in North West Tasmania by award-winning arts and social change organisation Big hART. This session sees Rachel Small, Yazmyn Butcher, and Holly Rankin-Smith examine the approach, the challenges and opportunities that have come out of 6 years of place-based practice, working with 100 young women to develop community engagement, arts-based skills, entrepreneurial thinking and advocacy.